September 18, 2017

Senator Hassan Participates in SOS Recovery Legislative Breakfast, Highlights Importance of Recovery Services for Granite Staters Struggling with Substance Misuse

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DOVER – Senator Maggie Hassan today highlighted the importance of prevention, treatment, and recovery services for Granite Staters struggling with substance use disorder at a legislative breakfast hosted by the SOS Recovery Community Organization.

“The heroin, fentanyl, and opioid crisis is devastating communities across New Hampshire and America, and SOS Recovery’s services play a critical role in our efforts to help those struggling with substance use disorder get back on their feet,” Senator Hassan said. “The bravery of those in recovery and families who have lost loved ones must be marked by our continued action, and I will continue to work with members of both parties to find solutions, while also standing firm against any effort – like the recently proposed Graham-Cassidy bill – that would slash funding for Medicaid and severely harm our efforts to combat this crisis.”

Senator Hassan also thanked SOS Recovery employee Elizabeth Atwood, who the Senator recognized as her inaugural Granite Stater of the Month, for the courage she has shown in getting into treatment and recovery for substance use disorder and the work she does now helping others who face the same challenges that she did.

Senator Hassan’s top priority continues to be strengthening treatment, prevention, recovery, and law enforcement efforts – just as it was as Governor. Her efforts include working to stop dangerous synthetic drugs such as fentanyl from being shipped through our borders, helping law enforcement crack down on synthetic substances and better prosecute drug traffickers, and establishing a permanent funding stream to provide and expand access to substance use disorder treatment. She also authored the Opioid Addiction Risk Transparency Act – which is now law – to help ensure that doctors understand that all opioids, even ones that are called “abuse-deterrent,” are addictive.

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